2 Replies to “determining the viability of responsive design”

  1. Well done J. The one thing I might debate you on is your Emerson example. Although I don’t believe responsive design is always the right choice, making an assumption on what the user wants based on device can be dangerous. I like to use the example of books on tape (or cd – showing my age). As you know, I have a fairly long commute so I thought it would a good way to pass the time. Much to my disappointment however, I found out that each book on CD is a shortened version of the actual book. I was extremely disappointed and immediately cancelled the service. The assumption was that since i was listening to the book on CD, I wanted a quicker experience, not the full story – this was, in my opinion, a bad assumption. I wanted all the content. The other thing to consider is how people are being led to content. If you have a separate/scaled down mobile site, and someone emails me a link to that site (I probably read 50% of my email on my phone), there’s a good chance that I won’t be able to read that content when I click on the link from my phone. Same is true if I do a google (or bing, or name your favorite search engine here….) search on my mobile device. There are many times that I do this and get a link to content that is inaccessible on mobile. I think one of my favorite quotes is from Karen McGrane – “Truncation is not a content strat…”

    I think a better strategy is highlighting content based on assumption, but still making everything available.

    keep up the good work.

    1. Well said Vee. I agree with your final point and believe we can take cues from leaders like AMAZON and GOOGLE who always make their full experience available regardless of the default presentation they provide you.

      Very funny quote by th….

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